Monthly Archives: March 2014

Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6 – Step 8: Download and Install the Flash Plugin for Firefox

Part of this series of posts: Oracle Database 12c on Linux 6

08-01

Type the following commands, pressing Enter after each line.

rpm -ivh http://linuxdownload.adobe.com/adobe-release/adobe-release-i386-1.0-1.noarch.rpm
rpm --import /etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-adobe-linux
yum install flash-plugin nspluginwrapper.x86_64 nspluginwrapper.i686 alsa-plugins-pulseaudio.i686 libcurl.i686

Note:

I shrank the terminal window so the commands would fit on one line, but this isn’t necessary. You can just continue typing past the end of the line and the command will wrap around to the next line. Don’t press enter until you’ve typed in the entire command. Also, check the output of the command as it’s not unusual to type one of the package names incorrectly. If you do, you can use the up arrow key and fix the command. It’s OK to try to install multiple times.

08-02

Type y at the Is this ok [y/N]: prompt and press Enter.

08-03

Eventually you’ll see a complete.

Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6 – Step 7: Update Oracle Linux with the Latest Software < Previous Post – Next Post > Oracle Database 12c on Linux 6 – Step 9: Download and Install Kernel, GCC, and Readline Packages

 


Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6 – Step 7: Update Oracle Linux with the Latest Software

Part of this series of posts: Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6

07-01

Type the following command and press Enter.

yum update

Note:

By default your Linux installation points to the public yum repository so there is no longer any need to update your yum configuration to get the above command to work. If you have support then you should first change your yum configuration to point to the correct repository.
Also, the package update process might have a hold on some files. If you get a message about this, just wait and eventually the hold will be released.

07-02

Type y at the Is this ok [y/N]: prompt and press Enter.

Note:

The number of packages may be different when you do your install if there have been more updates since this guide was written. You shouldn’t worry about it.

07-03

Type y at the Is this ok [y/N]: prompt and press Enter.

07-04

Eventually you’ll see a Complete!

Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6 – Step 6: Reset the root user password < Previous Post – Next Post > Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6 – Step 8: Download and Install the Flash Plugin for Firefox


Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6 – Step 6: Reset the root user password

Part of this series of posts: Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6

06-01

Type the following command and press Enter.

passwd

Type root at the New password prompt and press Enter (you’ll get the above error messages). Type root at the Retype new password prompt and press Enter.

Note:
See the note about Joes in the Introduction. Never use root as the root password for a system where security matters.

Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6 – Step 5: Disable the Firewall, iptables and SELINUX < Previous Post – Next Post > Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6 – Step 7: Update Oracle Linux with the Latest Software

 


Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6 – Step 5: Disable the Firewall, iptables and SELINUX

Part of this series of posts: Oracle 12c on Oracle Linux 6

05-01

Click Other….

05-02

Enter root as the username and click Log In.

05-03

Enter rootroot as the password (or the password you used earlier) and click Log In.

05-04

Check Do not show me this again and click Close.

Note:

Or don’t check Do not show me this again if you want to see this warning each time you log in to the X-Windows GUI as root. In general you shouldn’t be logging into the GUI as root. We’re going to do so because it will be easier to use some of the system tools (no pop-ups to log in again as root) to configure our system.

05-05

Select System -> Administration -> Firewall from the menu bar.

05-06

Click Close.

05-07

Click Disable.

05-08

Click Apply.

05-09

Click Yes.

05-10

Select File -> Quit to close the Firewall Configuration.

05-11

Select System -> Administration -> Services from the menu bar.

05-12

Select the ip6tables service and click Disable.

05-13

Select the iptables service and click Disable.

05-14

Select Program -> Quit to close the Services Configuration.

05-15

Right-click the desktop and select Open in Terminal to open a terminal window.

05-16

Type the following command and press Enter.

gedit /etc/sysconfig/selinux

Note:

You can use Ctrl-Shift + (the plus key) to change the font size of your terminal windows. I also resize my windows to fill the whole screen. Between major command groupings I’ll also type clear to remove the previous commands from the window and start fresh.

05-17

Change SELINUX=enforcing to SELINUX=disabled.

Note:

Why disable SELINUX? According to user 546612 on the Oracle.com forums:

Depending on what pieces of Oracle you are using, there are setuid/setgid issues, there are network interactions, there is fork/exec permission stuff, shared memory, etc. Some stuff in Oracle runs as root, especially if you do RAC. There is a whole whack of IPC.

Note that Redhat recently published a paper that describes how to make SELINUX work with Oracle 11g R2 on Redhat which should work on Oracle Linux too. Since this is a test system, disabling was easier…
http://www.redhat.com/resourcelibrary/reference-architectures/deploying-oracle-11gr2-on-rhel-6

05-18

Make sure your SELINUX line reads SELINUX=disabled and Click Save.

05-19

Select File -> Quit from the menu to close gedit.

Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6 – Step 4: Install Oracle Linux in the Virtual Machine < Previous Post – Next Post > Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6 – Step 6: Reset the root user password


Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6 – Step 4: Install Oracle Linux in the Virtual Machine

Part of this series of posts: Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6

04-01

Click Start.

04-02

You can click the message and check the Do not show this message again checkbox and then click the little blue x in the top right hand corner. Type Enter to select the Install or upgrade an existing system.

04-03

Again, you can click the message and check the Do not show this message again checkbox and then click the little blue x to dismiss the message. Use the Tab key to move the select to Skip and press Enter.

04-04

Click Next.

04-05

Click Next.

04-06

Click Next.

04-07

Click Next.

04-08

Click Yes, discard any data.

04-09

Click Configure Network, select the System eth0 Network Connection and click Edit…

04-10

Check the Connect automatically selection and click Apply…

04-11

Click Close.

04-12

Click Next.

Note:

You could change the name of the machine here if you wish, but the guide assumes that you’ve left the default of localhost.localdomain.

04-13

Select a city in your time zone and click Next.

04-14

Enter a password for the root user and click Next.

Note:

I use rootroot as the password. We’ll change it to root after we have installed. This generates the below alert.

04-15

Click Use Anyway.

04-16

Choose Create Custom Layout and click Next.

04-17

Select the Free partition under sda and click Create.

04-18

Choose Standard Partition and click Create.

04-19

Use the check box next to the Drive to deselect all drives.

04-20

Change the File System Type to swap, check sda, and set the size to 6144 and click OK.

Note:

I used 6144 because I set my memory size to 6 GB (6144 = 1024 x 6). If your memory size is 4 GB or more you can set this to your memory size. If your memory size is less than 4 GB you can set this to double your memory size.

04-21

Select the remaining Free space on sda and click Create.

04-22

Choose Standard Partition and click Create.

04-23

Use the Mount Point dropdown and choose / as the mount point. Again, deselect all the drives and check sda. Choose Fill to maximum allowable size in the Additional Size Options box. Check the Force to be a primary partition box and click OK.

04-24

You should see the above configuration. Click Next.

04-25

Click Format.

04-26

Click Write changes to disk.

04-27

Click Next.

04-28

Choose Desktop and click Next.

04-29

The install will take a while.

04-30

Click Reboot.

04-31

Click Forward.

04-32

Click Forward.

04-33

Choose No, I prefer to register at a later time and click Forward.

Note:

Oracle Linux Network Support for a year is only $119 and can be purchased at shop.oracle.com. This would give you a valid Oracle CSI which would allow you use the Oracle support system which has a ton of resources. If you do get a support license then you can use the Yes, I’d like to register now choice above.

04-34

Click No thanks, I’ll connect later.

04-35

Click Forward.

04-36

Click Forward.

Note:

If you decide to create a non-root user here then you’ll have an additional choice at the login screen for the system. You should not create the oracle user here as we’ll be using a specific package from Oracle to create the oracle user.

04-37

Click Yes.

04-38

Set your date and time or choose Synchronize date and time over the network and click Forward.

04-39

Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6 – Step 3: Configure an Oracle Linux Virtual Machine < Previous Post – Next Post > Oracle Database 12c on Oracle Linux 6 – Step 5: Disable the Firewall, iptables and SELINUX